Internet of Things

The Global Standards Initiative on Internet of Things (IoT-GSI) defined the IoT as “the infrastructure of the information society.”

The IoT is a giant network of connected things (ecosystem).

iot

The vision for IoT is that millions (and potentially billions) of devices will be connected to each other and the Internet allowing people to communicate with machines, and machines to communicate with other machines.

“Things,” in the IoT sense, can refer to a wide variety of IP-enabled devices and various devices such as cellphones, heart monitoring implants, biochip transponders, automobiles with built-in sensors, home monitoring devices, coffee machines, lamps, Amazon Eco, etc.

Analysts estimate that 20+ Billion devices will get connected to the Internet by 2020

IoT creates a large digital presence connecting organizations, cities and countries. Security decision makers must embrace fundamental principles of risk and resilience to drive change. With billions of devices connecting together in today’s digital environment, what can people and organizations do to make sure that their information’s stays secure. Will someone be able to hack into your toaster and thereby gain access to your entire network. The first step is to educate ourselves about what the IoT is and the impact on how we work and live with these devices. Second step include changing the default password on such devices if possible. Third, apply security and firmware updates.

 

The October 21, 2016 attack on online infrastructure provider Dyn was launched at least in part by Mirai, an open-source malware strain that scans the Internet for routers, cameras, digital video recorders and other Internet of Things “IoT” devices protected only by the factory-default passwords. Once infected with Mirai, the IoT systems can be used to flood a target with so much junk Web traffic that the target site can no longer accommodate legitimate users or visitors traffic, which resulted in a series of distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks.

The Mirai botnet attack took down parts of Twitter’s network, as well as hundreds of other sites—including GitHub, Box, The Verge, PlayStation Network, and personal webpage provider Wix. Level 3 Threat Research Labs has been continuously tracking these botnets as they wreak havoc on victims across the internet.

 

This article was written by Osei Owusu, Technical Consultant for  Tridea Partners. Tridea is a leading Microsoft Dynamics provider. www.trideapartners.com

 

Microsoft Dynamics GP 2016 R2 Feature of the Day -SmartList Favorite Protection

Enjoy your Microsoft Dynamics GP 2016 R2 Feature of the Day!

SmartList Favorite Protection

Microsoft Dynamics GP 2016 R2 Feature of the Day

Are you a Tridea client interested in installing Microsoft Dynamics GP 2016 R2?

Contact us first!  Tridea Partners 858.755.3700 or info@trideapartners.com

By Tridea Partners, Microsoft Dynamics Partner www.trideapartners.com

Read original post at: http://community.dynamics.com/gp/b/gpteamblog/default.aspx

Dynamics GP 2016 R2 Feature of the Day: SmartList Designer in Advanced Lookup

Enjoy your Microsoft Dynamics GP 2016 R2 Feature of the Day!

SmartList Designer in Advanced Lookup

GP 2016 R2 Smartlist Designer

Are you a Tridea client interested in installing Microsoft Dynamics GP 2016 R2?

Contact us first!  Tridea Partners 858.755.3700 or info@trideapartners.com

By Tridea Partners, Microsoft Dynamics Partner www.trideapartners.com

Read original post at: http://community.dynamics.com/gp/b/gpteamblog/default.aspx

Dynamics AX 2012 R3: Stopped Workflow Error

When working with different types of workflows in Microsoft Dynamics AX 2012, you may encounter a stopped workflow record with an error message detailing that AX ‘failed to create a session’.

AX 2012 R3 Stopped workflow error

The error message can be generated because the workflow is unable to assign the record to a user for review or approval.

To resolve this type of issue, the first step is to identify which user record is causing the issue. Because no user ID is mentioned in the error message, you can identify the user by first finding the step where the workflow stopped. In the Workflow history form, click the Tracking details tab (screenshot above) to identify the step in the Workflow activities pane which has the Workflow stopped error message.

Next, navigate to the workflow and open the workflow editor to determine if the workflow step is assigned to a user, user group, security role or hierarchy. If the step is assigned to a user, you can easily identify the user which is causing the issue. If the step is assigned to a user group, navigate to the ‘User group’ form [System administration>Common>Users>User groups] and click the Users tab for the user group to identify which users are assigned to the group. One or more of these users could be the cause of the issue. If the step is assigned to a security role, navigate to the ‘Assign users to roles’ form [System administration>Setup>Security>Assign users to roles] and select the role to identify which users are assigned to that security role. Again, it could be more than one user causing the issue. Lastly, if the assignment type is a hierarchy such as the managerial hierarchy, navigate to the Positions list page [Human resources>Common>Organization>Positions>Positions], filter on the worker who submitted the record to the workflow then pinpoint the position/worker the hierarchy would assign the record to based on the ‘Reports to’ field.

Once you have identified the user(s) the step is assigned to, verify that each user record is enabled, the user is assigned to the appropriate security roles and that the user record is associated with a worker record.

In the case I investigated recently, the approval step where the workflow stopped was assigned to a user group. One user in the group had been disabled in AX but the user was not removed from the user group. The workflow was attempting to assign the record to each user in the group. Because one user was not enabled, the workflow could not assign it to all users in the group which caused the workflow to stop at an approval step. Once the user was removed from the user group, the workflow was resumed and the record moved forward in the workflow as expected.

This post was written by Robin Ellsworth, AX Application Consultant at Tridea Partners. Tridea is a leading Microsoft Dynamics provider.